Rockin Out Cancer Benefit

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This is from Steve Shadinger:  This benefit is this Saturday April 23rd at The Tavern on Bells Ferry Road:

Our friend and beloved family member, Scott Stickney, is currently battling stage 3 rectal cancer. There is no pretty ribbon or annual telethon for rectal cancer and we intend to raise awareness for both prevention and recovery. We have established the Scott Stickney Cancer Recovery Fund through the Bank of America to facilitate individuals and corporate entities wanting to donate towards Scott’s recovery.
Earlier this year, Scott began to feel ill with periodic abdominal cramps and rectal bleeding. He initially dismissed the symptoms believing that stress alone was the problem. As his symptoms became more frequent and the pain more severe, he began to suspect there might be something more serious at the root cause. Tragically, Scott’s longtime girlfriend (Virginia) had been laid off shortly before this diagnosis and they both had lost access to quality health insurance. Scott was understandably reluctant to visit the doctor and postponed a check up until the symptoms became very severe. The situation resulted in him becoming physically unable to work and required that he visit the Kennestone Hospital or OnHealthy emergency room. He was immediately referred to a GI doctor and eventually received the diagnosis of Stage 3 Adenocarcinoma of the rectum. This is a very aggressive cancer and rare in someone at the young age of 40.
Scott’s medical team is very compassionate as they aggressively treat his cancer. He has had a “port” catheter inserted into his chest and is now mid-cycle of his constant chemotherapy and radiation treatments. His doctors have declared him disabled until all medical treatments are complete (chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, etc.). Scott is a self-employed master craftsman and his construction business, Stickworks Remodeling, has been indefinitely placed on hold. We are trying to raise funds to help Scott with the medical bills and living expenses in order to get him through this very difficult season of his life.
We look forward to Scott being once again healthy and cancer free. Let’s get Scott back to work and playing the music he enjoys sharing with others. Our intention is to eventually convert this fund into a permanent foundation. The goal of the foundation will be to help raise awareness of rectal and colon cancers, as well as the vital role that early detection plays in the prognosis of survival. When detected early, colon and rectal cancers are among the most treatable and curable. The problem is that no one really talks about these diseases, especially rectal cancer. Perhaps together we can all help to save lives. Please help us begin with Scott’s life.

April 23, 2011 @ the Tavern on Bells Ferry Road…DON’T MISS ROCKIN’ OUT CANCER BENEFIT BASH FOR MY GOOD FRIEND SCOTT STICKNEY, FORMER BASS PLAYER OF DIXIE GUNS….THIS IS GOING TO BE EPIC…FEATURING PERFORMANCES BY THE BOBBY MARTIN BAND, THE 404 BAND, NO SWEAT and SPECIAL ALL-STAR REUNION JAMS WITH DIXIE GUNS AND MECHANIX!!

How many cases and deaths are estimated to occur in 2011?

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the US, with about 141,210 new cases and 49,380 deaths expected in 2011. About 72% of cases arise in the colon and about 28% in the rectum.

How many people alive today have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer?

The National Cancer Institute estimates that more than 1.1 million Americans with a history of colorectal cancer were alive in January 2007. Some of these individuals were cancer-free, while others still had evidence of cancer and may have been undergoing treatment.

Who gets colorectal cancer?

Anyone can get colorectal cancer. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with cancer of the colon or rectum is about 5% for both men and women in the US.6

Age

Incidence and death rates for colorectal cancer increase with age. Overall, 90% of new cases and 94% of deaths occur in individuals 50 and older. The incidence rate of colorectal cancer is more than 15 times higher in adults 50 years and older than in those 20 to 49 years.7

Sex

Overall, colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates are about 35% to 40% higher in men than in women. The reasons for this are not completely understood, but likely reflect complex interactions between gender-related differences in exposure to hormones and risk factors.8 Gender differences in risk patterns may also help explain why the proportion of colorectal