HAIR at the Fabulous Fox Theatre

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Before the show Tuesday afternoon, I got a chance to speak with Singer/ Songwriter Kacie Sheik, one of the original and current performers in this production of HAIR.  She plays Jeanie, the pregnant character who is madly in love with Claude, portrayed by Paris Remillard.  First of all, what a voice!  Even over the phone, I could tell she was a serious talent.  Soft, feminine and melodic she told me she loves Atlanta and was here in 2003 performing a short engagement at the 14th Street Playhouse.  She came to this show at the beginning and has taken the entire unexpected journey from the Delacourt theater concert, to the current national tour.  This was also her Broadway debut.  By the way, HAIR will be returning to Broadway for 10 weeks in early July, in case anyone is working or vacationing in NYC this summer.

In regards to the day to day challenges of touring, I half expected Sheik to say that it’s tough or she misses her dog in the city, but she didn’t.  Sheik warmly expressed that touring is enjoyable, and that the company is, “…a well oiled machine of peace and love!”  This allows them to arrive at an unfamiliar theater, load in, have a sound check, a quick blocking session, dinner and perform that very night.  She said that HAIR lets them reach out to the audiences.  They can get up close and dirty, talk to the audience and stroke the lovely locks of an unsuspecting patron.  In the end, the people in the house can even go up and dance with the performers on stage.  The show stays fresh every night for the entertainers because they can see and react to the energy of those who came to watch them.

Because this show is rooted in such a specific time frame, I was wondering how the piece was relevant to today’s theater goers.   Sheik responded that it is definitely still relevant.   In a world riddled with conflict, HAIR has strong messages about love and war.  It also wasn’t that long ago, so the older generations can share the 60’s experience with the younger ones and be shocked in the process.  Facebook and Twitter has the world much more intimately connected.   Audience members can directly interface and touch the cast with their experiences.  People can share their feelings and tell these talented troubadours how much they enjoyed the show.  Sheik illustrated a story about a kid who thanked them over the internet and expressed how he was, “…nicer to people in homeroom,” since he had seen the show.

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