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Concert Reviews

Cage The Elephant

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So many times I go to a concert/show in hopes that I’ll get a glimpse at
rock and roll greatness, and hope that I won’t end up being bored to tears.
Cage The Elephant was no exception. I especially hoped that I wouldn’t be
bored to tears, since I’m a fan of both of their first two releases.

From the moment they hit the stage, front man, Matt Shultz, was on FIRE! It was
like he was channeling his inner, Iggy Pop and Mick Jagger. The place
erupted by the middle of the second song, as he dove into the crowd. It
wasn’t until about four songs in that he finally spoke to the crowd for the
first time. There was no down time. No time for pimping merch. No speeches
about some personal crusade or agenda. Matt did take a quick second for a
short mention of how jealous the band was of Atlanta being such a great
town, with great music.

Matt had a constant connection with the crowd during
the entire set. If they didn’t play every song off of both records they came
damn close. During the last song of the set, Matt dove into the crowd for
one last time, but unlike all the dives before, he took it to a new level.
He made his way into the center of the crowd, and like an erupting volcano
he rose from the crowd, being hoisted up above everyone, on his feet, not
missing a beat or a word, and making one last connection with his audience,
before saying goodbye, like very few front men/woman do, these days.

They made it clear from the first note, that they came to bring the rock show,
and they brought it with rock and roll greatness.

photos by Tina Louise

[nggallery id=271]

[pro-player width=’530′ height=’353′ type=’video’]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5y6gsucC0cc[/pro-player]

video credit: dot2pop

Concert Reviews

Jonah Parzen-Johnson at Lilypad

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Jonah Parzen-Johnson has an innate ability to make the baritone sax sound like bagpipes, and maybe that’s why I cried.

Mostly I cried because Jonah tells radiant stories with his saxophone and analog synth, working the brass and pedals to recreate the framework which surrounds his album Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow: Parzen-Johnson wanted to make “something of myself that’s for everybody else.”

Jonah opened his set with “Stay There, I’ll Come to You,” showcasing the harmony between synth and sax right off the bat. With haunting lilts, the two combined into a ribbon of melody, pulsating inside the ear as well as the heart. Much like the song’s title, Jonah was the one approaching the audience as an experimental troubadour of tête-à-tête.

The back stories and thoughts behind each song tied in so well with the raw, almost throaty sax, developing such strong, emotional resonance with the musical layers. The skeleton shook.

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Concert Reviews

Speedy Ortiz “riiiiise above and gliiiiiide away” at The Sinclair

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The Sinclair was a packed house Wednesday night for the Speedy Ortiz CD release party; as a hometown gig for the Northampton, MA-based band, kinetic warmth buzzed through friends and fans alike as Sadie Dupuis and crew played their freshly-release Foil Deer track-by-track.

What’s a party without some guests, though? That’s where Krill and Mitski come in.

Krill kicked off the night with some tracks from A Distant Fist Unclenching, other goods from Lucky Leaves. Lead singer/bassist Jonah Furman brought to mind early (read: good) Billy Corgan, which I’m not sure he will appreciate. But I think he’ll appreciate this: I couldn’t stop laughing because then I kept thinking about Marilyn Manson telling Billy Corgan that he looked like Charlie Brown.

Opening with “Theme from Krill,” the Boston trio has a knack for rhythm and melody that burrows into your brain. The dreamy bleakness of “Purity of Heart.”  The discordant garage rock and hiccupping guitar and warbly Scooter-ness of “Foot.” Krill’s sound is a good, comfy noise that keeps you wiggling and all that good stuff. Be sure to catch the band at Boston Calling.

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Concert Reviews

Years & Years at Royale Boston

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During winter storm Juno, UK electro pop group Years & Years were forced to cancel the first show of their two-night stint in New York City back in January. After the snow finally melted, they made the rounds again this past March, playing several shows in California, South by Southwest before finally landing in Boston.

Due to popular demand, the show was moved from The Sinclair to the Royale in downtown’s Theater District.

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