Connect with us

Concert Reviews

Immortal Technique… Review and Interview

Published

on

Immortal Technique’s love for music and passion for progress was displayed all night through his music and the performances from the likes of Akir, Suede 7, Killer Mike, and Diabolic with the help of DJ GI Joe making the beats.  You could tell that it was more than just a bunch of performers on stage.  It was a brotherhood playing together for the love of music and the fans.  They cared about the message they were trying to get out and wanted to inspire the audience to go out, make their own decision, and change something.  Each artist came out and did their thing.  They were able to connect to the audience with ease and keep everyone interested.  There was never once where the audience was just standing in confusion.

Suede 7 came out strong and literally “spoke the truth” just as he said he would.  I remember being told by a friend of mine “I haven’t heard stuff like this in a long time!”  Akir was next to come out and he performed “Right to Bear Arms” with Suede 7, a song about responsibility despite what you may think.  He also performed his song “Apocalypse” and showed off his talent by killing it all night.  When Killer Mike came out, he knew what Atlanta wanted.  The show was insane.  He began with “Never Scared” (original by Bone Crusher) to get the crowd all pumped up and never let up from their bringing in a new member of his “gang” named Reggie P and stating that “There is nothing different between anyone of you that wasn’t artificially put there.”  When Diabolic came on, it was game on.  Another guy who nonstop spoke the truth-telling you to be yourself, take responsibility, and make things better.  Who cares what others say or do as long as you do you.  The star behind the stars however, DJ GI Joe.  His skill was incredible and he was able to put on a show of his own, especially when they were showcasing his talents.

Here comes, Immortal Technique.  Hyped up and ready to go with all his “brothers” backing him up on stage.  Immortal Technique has an aggressive style that just throws the message and emotion in your face and says listen to this and do something. Stop being lazy, life is not a cake walk.  In between songs, Immortal Technique would talk to the audience and speak his message and motivate the crowd.  He performed songs like “I Made a Mistake,” “One,” “Dance With the Devil,” “Goonies Never Die,” and “Angels & Demons.”  He performed a lot of his new material “The Martyr” and gave us a history lesson in his older material.  He also stressed downloading his new album for free on Viperrecords.com and sharing it with everyone you know.  The performance on stage throughout was filled with passion and he was content in the message he was trying to get across.  The two songs that seemed to really hit close to everyone, especially Immortal Technique, were “Dance with the Devil” and “Toast to the Dead,” which is a toast to his good friend, the late J. Dilla and a great show of respect. At the end of the show Immortal Technique literally met everyone saying they are the same as the rest of us and no different so they will stay after and sign autographs and hang out.  Immortal Technique’s style and performance is and was life changing and inspiring to say the least.

 

Interview:

TBB: What do you think about the current state of Hip Hop and the lack of Diversity that is in today’s main stream?

IT: What’s played on the radio is determined by how much is invested into the radio.  The market is dictated in the investors.

TBB: When do you think your new album “Middle Passage” will drop?

IT: Sometime early next year probably.

TBB: How many downloads has “The Martyr” gotten since its release (Released October 27, 2011)?

IT: Around 400,000. We expect to break 500, 000 next week.

TBB: Who are your favorite artists to perform with?

IT: This is a hard one.  He actually just left us.  I’d have to say it is DJ Rock Raider.  He was such a good friend and he never asked for anything even when I offered to pay him he wouldn’t accept it.

TBB: Are there any artists you would consider, or are wanting to, do collaboration with?

 IT: I’m actually talking with Lupe Fiasco. We might do something.

TBB: What do you think of Odd Future and what they are doing right now and breaking through?

IT: It’s a good thing what they’re doing. It’s good to see some people to make it through and being themselves and being creative and unique and it’d be nice to see more people coming out like that. It’s always good seeing that and I hope they keep it up and do well and be themselves.

TBB: When you’re in Atlanta where do you like to visit?

IT: I like to visit my friends.  Go visit Killa G and his mom cooks for us and I just like to visit friends and go to Tree Sounds Studios sometimes.

TBB: What is the main difference between performing here and overseas?

IT: They expect more.  Here you can perform an hour set and everything be cool. Overseas, they demand more.  If you can’t do at least an hour and a half set then what are you? They expect you to be able to at least do that and prove yourself.  Overseas they also show you love even if they don’t understand you.  I can go and speak English and no one understand what I am saying and still get just as much love as the next artist who may be speaking in their language.

TBB: What college did you attend when you went? And What happened there?

IT:  I went to Penn State. There was a lot of educated ignorance. I encountered a lot of educated ignorance up there. Majority of people would see someone who looked Hispanic and just assumed they were all the same and were all just Hispanic or Spanish, but never took into account where they were from.  If someone is from Guatemala, then they are Guatemalan.  Everyone is from somewhere. They didn’t even seem to know where they were from.  Everyone is from somewhere whether it be from Ireland, England, Whales, Scotland, China, Africa, wherever. Everyone came from somewhere, no one just appeared here.

TBB: What was the Hip Hop scene like in New York?

IT: Its competitive.  No one cares about you. It is ruthless.  They don’t care if you’re there or not. Everyone is there to see who they are there for and to get them to care about you is hard.  You have to be good to survive.

TBB: If there was one you thing you could change in government what would it be?
IT: Lobbyists.

Concert Reviews

Jonah Parzen-Johnson at Lilypad

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

Jonah Parzen-Johnson has an innate ability to make the baritone sax sound like bagpipes, and maybe that’s why I cried.

Mostly I cried because Jonah tells radiant stories with his saxophone and analog synth, working the brass and pedals to recreate the framework which surrounds his album Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow: Parzen-Johnson wanted to make “something of myself that’s for everybody else.”

Jonah opened his set with “Stay There, I’ll Come to You,” showcasing the harmony between synth and sax right off the bat. With haunting lilts, the two combined into a ribbon of melody, pulsating inside the ear as well as the heart. Much like the song’s title, Jonah was the one approaching the audience as an experimental troubadour of tête-à-tête.

The back stories and thoughts behind each song tied in so well with the raw, almost throaty sax, developing such strong, emotional resonance with the musical layers. The skeleton shook.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Concert Reviews

Speedy Ortiz “riiiiise above and gliiiiiide away” at The Sinclair

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

The Sinclair was a packed house Wednesday night for the Speedy Ortiz CD release party; as a hometown gig for the Northampton, MA-based band, kinetic warmth buzzed through friends and fans alike as Sadie Dupuis and crew played their freshly-release Foil Deer track-by-track.

What’s a party without some guests, though? That’s where Krill and Mitski come in.

Krill kicked off the night with some tracks from A Distant Fist Unclenching, other goods from Lucky Leaves. Lead singer/bassist Jonah Furman brought to mind early (read: good) Billy Corgan, which I’m not sure he will appreciate. But I think he’ll appreciate this: I couldn’t stop laughing because then I kept thinking about Marilyn Manson telling Billy Corgan that he looked like Charlie Brown.

Opening with “Theme from Krill,” the Boston trio has a knack for rhythm and melody that burrows into your brain. The dreamy bleakness of “Purity of Heart.”  The discordant garage rock and hiccupping guitar and warbly Scooter-ness of “Foot.” Krill’s sound is a good, comfy noise that keeps you wiggling and all that good stuff. Be sure to catch the band at Boston Calling.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Concert Reviews

Years & Years at Royale Boston

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

During winter storm Juno, UK electro pop group Years & Years were forced to cancel the first show of their two-night stint in New York City back in January. After the snow finally melted, they made the rounds again this past March, playing several shows in California, South by Southwest before finally landing in Boston.

Due to popular demand, the show was moved from The Sinclair to the Royale in downtown’s Theater District.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Trending