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Concert Reviews

The Reverend Horton Heat with The Supersuckers

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On October 27,  The Supersuckers and the Reverend Horton Heat played at the Masquerade in Atlanta. The Reverend Horton Heat trio was on tour promoting their new album alongside “the greatest rock n roll band”, the Supersuckers.

The Supersuckers are a great rock n roll band from Seattle, Washington. I have seen them several times in Atlanta over the years, and I have always enjoyed their shows. Their songs are lighthearted and sometimes funny, touching on subjects like Ex’s and fighting for fun. The Supersuckers performance is always great to watch. Dan and Marty are rocking with rock n roll riffs and grandiose rock poses. Their drummer Scott is a pretty amazing player. He had a few drum solos during their set ,and I was quite surprised by his talent (not to say I didn’t think he was talented in the first place). Having ten plus albums, the Supersuckers set list covered a wide range of old and new tunes. The played favorite like mudhead, creepy jackalope eye, and born with a tail. The crowd ate it up by cheering and dancing around. Your “Cruisin for a Bruisin” if you haven’t seen this band yet. Always a great band to check out!

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Setlist:
Go
Luck
Bad, Bad, Bad
Evil Powers of Rock ‘n’ Roll
Paid
Mudhead
Beat to Shit
Pushing Through
Sleepy Vampire
On the Couch
Coattail Rider
Bubblegum & Beer
Creepy Jackalope Eye
Something About You
Rock ‘n’ Roll Records (Ain’t Sellin’ This Year)
Rock Your Ass
Dirt Roads, Dead Ends and Dust
Fisticuffs
How to Maximize Your Kill Count
Goodbye
(Fake Encore – U.S. Patent Pending)
Pretty Fucked Up
Born with a Tail

Up next was the psychobilly band The Reverend Horton Heat from Dallas,Texas. This was my first time seeing the Reverend perform, and I have heard many different things about them. One thing I have heard is they are great live. The second thing I have heard is that the singer sometimes likes to smash photographers cameras. So, I was discreet as possible while photographing them play. The Reverend Horton Heat has been around for 25 years and has nine studio albums. The band took the stage and the went right into the tune Psychobilly Freakout. Right away I thought they were they were a cool band. Also, I didn’t realize Jimbo played an upright bass, which made it even cooler. The RHH’s is no stranger with their fans, and they played a wide range of songs from their albums which included Jimbo’s song, Baddest of the Bad, Death Metal Guys, and even a Johnny Cash cover of Folsom Prison Blues. The crowd loved it and they were cheering and dancing. The Rev had some pretty cool moves like surfing on Jimbo’s upright bass. There was a great drum solo mixed into the set where the drummers from The Supersuckers and The Rev played together on one drum kit. Pretty awesome if you ask me. The Rev did an encore where they pre-selected songs, and they took some requests too. All in all the Reverend Horton Heat knows how to please their fans and put on a great show! Sorry guys, I was only able to find an incomplete set list online. Oh and the Rev didn’t bust up my camera!!

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Concert Reviews

Jonah Parzen-Johnson at Lilypad

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Jonah Parzen-Johnson has an innate ability to make the baritone sax sound like bagpipes, and maybe that’s why I cried.

Mostly I cried because Jonah tells radiant stories with his saxophone and analog synth, working the brass and pedals to recreate the framework which surrounds his album Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow: Parzen-Johnson wanted to make “something of myself that’s for everybody else.”

Jonah opened his set with “Stay There, I’ll Come to You,” showcasing the harmony between synth and sax right off the bat. With haunting lilts, the two combined into a ribbon of melody, pulsating inside the ear as well as the heart. Much like the song’s title, Jonah was the one approaching the audience as an experimental troubadour of tête-à-tête.

The back stories and thoughts behind each song tied in so well with the raw, almost throaty sax, developing such strong, emotional resonance with the musical layers. The skeleton shook.

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Concert Reviews

Speedy Ortiz “riiiiise above and gliiiiiide away” at The Sinclair

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The Sinclair was a packed house Wednesday night for the Speedy Ortiz CD release party; as a hometown gig for the Northampton, MA-based band, kinetic warmth buzzed through friends and fans alike as Sadie Dupuis and crew played their freshly-release Foil Deer track-by-track.

What’s a party without some guests, though? That’s where Krill and Mitski come in.

Krill kicked off the night with some tracks from A Distant Fist Unclenching, other goods from Lucky Leaves. Lead singer/bassist Jonah Furman brought to mind early (read: good) Billy Corgan, which I’m not sure he will appreciate. But I think he’ll appreciate this: I couldn’t stop laughing because then I kept thinking about Marilyn Manson telling Billy Corgan that he looked like Charlie Brown.

Opening with “Theme from Krill,” the Boston trio has a knack for rhythm and melody that burrows into your brain. The dreamy bleakness of “Purity of Heart.”  The discordant garage rock and hiccupping guitar and warbly Scooter-ness of “Foot.” Krill’s sound is a good, comfy noise that keeps you wiggling and all that good stuff. Be sure to catch the band at Boston Calling.

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Concert Reviews

Years & Years at Royale Boston

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During winter storm Juno, UK electro pop group Years & Years were forced to cancel the first show of their two-night stint in New York City back in January. After the snow finally melted, they made the rounds again this past March, playing several shows in California, South by Southwest before finally landing in Boston.

Due to popular demand, the show was moved from The Sinclair to the Royale in downtown’s Theater District.

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