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Dancer With An Attitude

Travis Magee World Premiere Solo Exhibition “Silo”

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In this day and age with social networking and everything available at a glance, I find that there is an incredible potential to connect, be engaged in the things and people you enjoy.  This is the age of “LIKE” and generation “SHARE”.  There is a lot of junk to sift through sometimes…most times…but the gems can be found.  I would “LIKE” to “SHARE” one I have found.  Dance photographer Travis Magee.

I have always said that the frustrating thing about dance, as an art form, is that you have to be there to get it.  Dance is an experiential art.  There is nothing you can pull out of the closet to share after it is all said and done.  Pale video representations and flat images don’t translate the viscera of live performance. Travis Magee has done it, bottled the experience in his photography and has created something truly spectacular and breathtaking.  He has captured the essence of the dance experience in a medium that can be taken out of the theaters, put on a wall and enjoyed every day.

In the summer of 2012, Magee spent 10 days in residency at DANCE NOW SILO, an 80 acre farm in Springtown, Pennsylvania with creative freedom to produce dance photography. He brought together 17 dancers from some of the world’s most prominent and influential dance companies including some of the Dancer With An Attitude’s all time favorites; Mark Morris, Alvin Ailey, Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, Larry Keigwin, Aszure Barton, Sean Curran and others. It was the first time so many dancers from such diverse backgrounds have come together for one photographer.

His kinetic images depict beautiful figures haphazardly caught in the middle of grand action.  If I were to name this exhibit it would be “A Perfect Split Second”.  The settings are rural, organic and wild but ironically the stable force in the composition. It is the dancers who are the unpredictable element, as though nature and human have switched roles.

The most incredible part of this work, and the part that is a testament to Mr. Magee’s talent, is that there aren’t any tricks involved.  In a time when there is so much technology available to alter, composite and build images, his are achieved in one shot and not manipulated in Photoshop. He captures dynamic crescendo moments and, more importantly, visually represents what the experiences must have been like.

 

New Yorkers and surrounding art lovers have the privilege of experiencing Mr. Magee’s work first hand in his World Premiere Solo Exhibition “Silo.”

The opening night party is at 7pm Friday, November 16th at Space On Whitea socially-conscious space for artists located in Tribeca that encourages collaboration and growth for artists and their audiences.

This exhibit can be enjoyed through New Year’s Day 2013.

If you are not fortunate enough to be near NYC to attend this gallery showing, then buy a picture, get the buzz out on your Facebook and Twitter webs or just throw money at him. If you love dance, do something to support this artist who serves the dance community so well.  He is worth it.

Nov. 16th at 7PM- Jan. 1st, 2013
Space On White
81 White Street New York, NY 10013.
(212) 227-8600

Connect With Travis on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dance-Photography-by-Travis-Magee/141621142605885

Dancer With An Attitude

The Movement In Stillness – “First Breath” by Travis Magee

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“First Breath”, a new exhibition of photography by Travis Magee

The Frieda and Roy Furman Gallery
Film Society of Lincoln Center
Beginning 1.31.15

There are these moments among skilled choreography and seasoned performances where you lose yourself. If you happen to be experiencing this, you will most probably hear a gasp or a groan. There is no language adequate to tell the tale later because they affect you in a primal, visceral way. These moments transcend language and are too intimate to describe. To those of you who don’t frequent the many exquisite dance events happening around the world today… this is the reason to see dance live! The bitter sweet dichotomy can perpetuate a frustration, that the experiences can’t REALLY be translated to anyone who wasn’t at the dance performances, sharing the adventure. These feelings lead to the question, “How do we bottle this?”

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Dancer With An Attitude

Dearly Departures: “A Long Way… A Longer Distance Call”

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photo : Chris Carder
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The Lucky Penny has become a cornerstone of Atlanta’s cutting edge dance and technology. Dearly Departures: A new dance by Blake Beckham and her impeccable motley crew of technicians and performers, at Georgia Tech’s DramaTech Theater, have created yet another night of artistic excellence

The little black box theatre, more of a trapezoidal space is reminiscent of the old train stations lined with a long illuminated bench Stage Left, an “Old Skool” telephone booth Stage Right and a Split Flap display board hanging above. The experience begins with a Rolodex scrolling sound as the Split Flap illustrates very slow, movie style, credits. This sets a mellow tone, allowing the audience to hunker down in our seats and get comfortable. The lights dim then flicker off, in a “cool” and unusual manner, foreshadowing the unexpected and poetic experience to come.

The clickety clack of the display is overtaken by ambient music and lights go up on dancer Alisa Mitten. She smoothly makes her way around with long relaxed movements, allowing her fingertips to initiate her locomotion. As we watch, the Split Flap is feeding us contemplative ideas to ponder as the action unfolds.

“Away… Way back… Go… Go… Go back.” And a repeated mantra of “Begin again” & “Begin & End.”

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Dance

T. Lang: A Woman Searching

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The raw space at the Goat Farm is set up with four see through scrims hanging from the ceiling, situated in a square, to separate the performers from the audience.  Seats are arranged in the round, meaning all the way “a round” where the action was about to take place.  The first question of the evening is to figure out which side of the room we want to experience this evening from.  Obviously, there is no right or wrong… just questions.

On June 7th, I found myself asking a lot of questions at the World premiere of T. Lang Dance Company’s  performance of Post Up.  The cast of nine extraordinary women were uniformly exposed in white bras and cherry red leggings.   The uniformity brought to mind a complex woman or many women in a similar situation, perhaps battered or in a prison.  An inquiry later enhanced by zig-zagged projections on the fabric we were looking through.  The tastefully sparse costumes highlighted the performers’ beauty and I was reminded of how majestic women are, in all iterations, with different curves, hair lengths, textures and hues of skin.

The tone in this screened in cage was desperate, sad and played with themes of struggle and vulnerability but through it all a feminine strength became apparent.  Not only through the athleticism of these prodigious artistic athletes but in an instinctual comradery that naturally exists between woman, especially at times of crisis.

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