Connect with us

Concert Reviews

Flogging Molly at The Tabernacle

Published

on

When people think about attending a family reunion it often brings to mind images of holidays spent around the dining room table or sitting in front of a fireplace telling stories. For the Flogging Molly fans in the Atlanta area, nothing says family like bouncing around in the pit. The last time our clan came together was on February 14, 2011, right before they released their most recent album, Speed of Darkness. After missing the area last year, I was checking months in advance, crossing my fingers that the band would add Atlanta to this year’s list of destinations. The minute I got the word, I made sure that family, friends, and Facebook followers alike knew that they would occupy the hallowed halls of The Tabernacle on February 9th. After all, they would need to start stretching their leg muscles early.

The evening began with the introduction of Dave Hause and Skinny Lister to the throngs of fans assembled. I had the brief thought that it might not be the best idea to have a dude from Philly, a solo singer-songwriter with little more than his guitar, open up the show for THE Celtic punk band, much less at a place like The Tabernacle. I should have learned from past experience and trusted the judgment of my favorite band. If his voice didn’t grab your attention, his sassy attitude, freakishly good looks and incredible storytelling got you hooked. Check out Dave’s single “Time Will Tell” on YouTube to satisfy both your eyes and ears.

I have only three words to describe to Skinny Lister: Ah-maz-ING!  This folk-punk band, hailing from the mean streets of London, made us all feel like we were just as much a part of the tour as they were. Including us in the vocals and instrumentals, the free-spirited Lorna Thomas made sure everyone was participating and having an incredible time; the perfect way to get us all moving in anticipation for the main act. I mean, the upright bass player, Dan Gray, went crowd surfing … WITH the bass!

For any of my friends on Facebook, you got a helping of status updates throughout the show to ensure everyone knew what a jolly good time we all were having. Starting off the show with “Another Bag of Bricks” from the Drunken Lullabies album, the Tabernacle became the only place in the world we all wanted to be.

Dave King, storyteller extraordinaire, made sure to engross us with stories of his late father and his family while regaling us with such hits as “Power’s Out” (dedicated to the people of the northeast), “Drunken Lullabies,” “Selfish Man,” and “Paddy’s Lament.”

I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Flogging Molly at least five times in the last several years, and this year I noticed a change in them. A seasoned fan can tell the band’s sound has changed to a more mature and sometimes acoustic sound, but there’s no denying this band still knows how to rock out. For the final number, friends joined strangers in a swaying rendition of “World Alive,” and as always, Flogging Molly left us wanting more. No amount of coaxing could bring them back to the stage, so let’s raise a glass to hope they come back around sooner rather than later.

P.S. To the dude in the pit who broke his ankle during “Seven Deadly Sins”—I hope you don’t let a little fracture get you down. We’d all love to see you next time.

 

Concert Reviews

Jonah Parzen-Johnson at Lilypad

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

Jonah Parzen-Johnson has an innate ability to make the baritone sax sound like bagpipes, and maybe that’s why I cried.

Mostly I cried because Jonah tells radiant stories with his saxophone and analog synth, working the brass and pedals to recreate the framework which surrounds his album Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow: Parzen-Johnson wanted to make “something of myself that’s for everybody else.”

Jonah opened his set with “Stay There, I’ll Come to You,” showcasing the harmony between synth and sax right off the bat. With haunting lilts, the two combined into a ribbon of melody, pulsating inside the ear as well as the heart. Much like the song’s title, Jonah was the one approaching the audience as an experimental troubadour of tête-à-tête.

The back stories and thoughts behind each song tied in so well with the raw, almost throaty sax, developing such strong, emotional resonance with the musical layers. The skeleton shook.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Concert Reviews

Speedy Ortiz “riiiiise above and gliiiiiide away” at The Sinclair

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

The Sinclair was a packed house Wednesday night for the Speedy Ortiz CD release party; as a hometown gig for the Northampton, MA-based band, kinetic warmth buzzed through friends and fans alike as Sadie Dupuis and crew played their freshly-release Foil Deer track-by-track.

What’s a party without some guests, though? That’s where Krill and Mitski come in.

Krill kicked off the night with some tracks from A Distant Fist Unclenching, other goods from Lucky Leaves. Lead singer/bassist Jonah Furman brought to mind early (read: good) Billy Corgan, which I’m not sure he will appreciate. But I think he’ll appreciate this: I couldn’t stop laughing because then I kept thinking about Marilyn Manson telling Billy Corgan that he looked like Charlie Brown.

Opening with “Theme from Krill,” the Boston trio has a knack for rhythm and melody that burrows into your brain. The dreamy bleakness of “Purity of Heart.”  The discordant garage rock and hiccupping guitar and warbly Scooter-ness of “Foot.” Krill’s sound is a good, comfy noise that keeps you wiggling and all that good stuff. Be sure to catch the band at Boston Calling.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Concert Reviews

Years & Years at Royale Boston

Published

on

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse

During winter storm Juno, UK electro pop group Years & Years were forced to cancel the first show of their two-night stint in New York City back in January. After the snow finally melted, they made the rounds again this past March, playing several shows in California, South by Southwest before finally landing in Boston.

Due to popular demand, the show was moved from The Sinclair to the Royale in downtown’s Theater District.

Prev1 of 3Next
← → (arrow) keys to browse
Continue Reading

Trending