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Concert Reviews

Speedy Ortiz “riiiiise above and gliiiiiide away” at The Sinclair

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Mitski made her return to The Sinclair in support of the re-release of Bury Me At Makeout Creek, highlighted by an address to the audience about finding the thing that made her feel beautiful—she said that she never felt traditionally beautiful, nor did she have the money to at least make that the case. So music it was; perhaps a selfish endeavor, she wondered. But what Mitski hoped was that the crowd could find the thing that made them feel beautiful.

The quality of the set came as no surprise. Bury Me At Makeout Creek is ferocious as it is gorgeous, lo-fi band sounds for band sounds’ sake. If the opportunity should arise to see Mitski play live, please make a concerted effort. You will not be disappointed.

Speedy Ortiz got right to business. PARTY BUSINESS ,THAT IS. New guitarist, new album. They launched with Foil Deer opener “Good Neck” before second track—and my personal favorite—“Raising the Skate” as Sadie Dupuis announced that they’d play the album in full and in order.

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Concert Reviews

Jonah Parzen-Johnson at Lilypad

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Jonah Parzen-Johnson has an innate ability to make the baritone sax sound like bagpipes, and maybe that’s why I cried.

Mostly I cried because Jonah tells radiant stories with his saxophone and analog synth, working the brass and pedals to recreate the framework which surrounds his album Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow: Parzen-Johnson wanted to make “something of myself that’s for everybody else.”

Jonah opened his set with “Stay There, I’ll Come to You,” showcasing the harmony between synth and sax right off the bat. With haunting lilts, the two combined into a ribbon of melody, pulsating inside the ear as well as the heart. Much like the song’s title, Jonah was the one approaching the audience as an experimental troubadour of tête-à-tête.

The back stories and thoughts behind each song tied in so well with the raw, almost throaty sax, developing such strong, emotional resonance with the musical layers. The skeleton shook.

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Concert Reviews

Years & Years at Royale Boston

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During winter storm Juno, UK electro pop group Years & Years were forced to cancel the first show of their two-night stint in New York City back in January. After the snow finally melted, they made the rounds again this past March, playing several shows in California, South by Southwest before finally landing in Boston.

Due to popular demand, the show was moved from The Sinclair to the Royale in downtown’s Theater District.

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Concert Reviews

Hundred Waters Entrance The Sinclair

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Suno Deko, Mitski, and Hundred Waters wove a tapestry of atmosphere Saturday night–eclectic, punky, and entrancing, it was all a dream that you didn’t want to wake up from. The Sinclair was not short on ambience in any capacity.

One-man outfit Suno Deko, hailing from Atlanta, captured his loops one by one, patiently re-recording when something was off by a hair. Known in civilian life as David Courtright, Suno Deko interspersed his experimental pop with dashes of dry humor, sharing with the crowd that the folks in Montreal were pretty chatty during his set and that they didn’t really seem to think they were like the Wildlings north of the Wall. Supporting his 2014 EP Thrown Color, Courtwright’s material ranged from aquatic melancholy to static delirium. The performance being Suno Deko’s last opening for Hundred Waters on the tour, it was an amazing final night.

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